The Minnesota Vikings won’t have followers at their first two home games, if no longer for the entire year, the jarring end result of the international pandemic that has became 2020 upside down.

Still, they’ll try to keep U.S. Bank Stadium as much of an benefit for them as possible.

Vikings give up scrimmage at U.S. Bank Stadium with assertion for social justice
A Vikings fan’s guide to delusion football in 2020

The Vikings took their first steps on the synthetic turf Friday afternoon for the reason that the end of the last everyday season, conducting one half of an intrasquad sport whilst alternating quarters as host and visitor. The pre-recorded crowd noise that the NFL has allowed teams to use this year played over the sound system, a cacophony of ordinary stadium sounds well brief of the loudest roars but noisy adequate to help cut down the reality that the red seats have been empty. The “Skol Vikings” theme music hummed through the audio system after the offense scored, as sunshine beamed through the translucent roof.

Defensive cease Danielle Hunter, the two-time Super Bowl select who is one of the team’s most critical players mainly his former protective end companion Everson Griffen now playing for Dallas, was sidelined for an 11th consecutive practice. Jalyn Holmes once more took his place with the first team defense. Zimmer has only described Hunter’s unspecified harm as “a little tweak” besides responsibility to divulge the nature of it until Sept. 9.

“Sometimes they take a long time,” Zimmer stated Thursday.

Once the scrimmage was once finished, most of the gamers and coaches walked to the east stop sector whilst instruct Mike Zimmer, running returned Ameer Abdullah, tight cease Kyle Rudolph and safety Anthony Harris addressed the media about the team’s initiatives to pursue social justice. The today’s societal flashpoint, the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man in Kenosha, Wisconsin, led to a two-hour inner assembly on Thursday earlier than players sooner or later determined to practice.

The Vikings took no questions from reporters, talking as the words “Be The Change” were displayed on the supersized video board at the back of the opposite end of the field.

“We’re disgusted through the things that we’re seeing, the lack of empathy that’s been shown, the hijacking of narratives. The listing goes on and on, and from time to time it can feel hopeless,” Abdullah said, citing sustainable programs to tackle poverty and deal with mental health as broader dreams and the prosecution of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for his role in the death of George Floyd as a specific desire. Floyd, a handcuffed Black man, died after Chauvin’s knee used to be on his neck for nearly 8 minutes, just three miles south of the stadium.

Owners Zygi Wilf and Mark Wilf issued a assertion expressing their support for the players.