A memorial to former N.F.L. owner George Preston Marshall in Washington and a statue of former baseball owner Calvin Griffith in Minneapolis have been removed.

Twins Minnesota said it removed a statue of Griffith, which has been outside of Target Field since 2010. This happened because of the obscene remarks he made about African Americans in 1978. Regulatory Authority Stadium location has confirmed that the Marshall monument has been permanently deleted.

When Target Field opened in 2010, a statue of Griffith, a former owner of Twins and who was responsible for the franchising came to Minnesota from Washington in 1961.

This is one of several to be installed around a stadium. Twins announced that they removed it, saying their group couldn’t keep quiet and continued to ignore the racist comments he made at a community event in 1978.

While they acknowledge the outstanding role that Calvin Griffith has played in their history, they are unable to remain silent and continue to ignore the racist comments he made at Waseca in 1978. Words His disdain demonstrates intolerance and contempt for the black community. That’s the opposite of what Twins Minnesota represents.

Griffith also commented on the underpaying of Twins’ first star, Rod Carew. The man then vowed never to play for Griffith again and was exchanged for the California Angels prior to the 1979 season.

Our decision to commemorate Calvin Griffith with a statue reflected a lack of understanding of a part of racism. They apologize for not fully realizing how the statue was viewed and the pain it caused many people.

They weren’t able to remove Calvin Griffith from the history of Twins Minnesota, but they believe that removing this statue is an important and necessary step in their continued commitment to providing a Target Field experience where everyone Fans and staff both feel safe and welcome.

Earlier this month, the Pohlad family announced that they had pledged $ 25 million to social justice causes following the death of George Floyd, who was killed after a city police officer knelt on his neck in almost nine minutes on May 25.